Sodium chloride is soluble in water but not in benzene because
(1)  ΔHSolvation < ΔHLattice energy in water and ΔHSolvation > ΔHLattice Energy in Benzene

(2) ΔHSolvation > ΔHLattice energy in water and ΔHSolvation < ΔHLattice Energy in Benzene
(3) ΔHSolvation = ΔHLattice energy in water and ΔHSolvation < ΔHLattice Energy in Benzene
(4) ΔHSolvation < ΔHLattice energy in water and ΔHSolvation = ΔHLattice Energy in Benzene

Answer: Option 2
Explanation:
Sodium chloride (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of positively charged sodium ions (Na+) and negatively charged chloride ions (Cl-). When NaCl is added to water, the water molecules surround the ions and separate them from each other. This process is called solvation or hydration. The energy change associated with this process is called the enthalpy of solvation (ΔHSolvation).

In water, the partially negative oxygen atoms of the water molecules are attracted to the positively charged sodium ions, while the partially positive hydrogen atoms are attracted to the negatively charged chloride ions. This results in a strong solvation effect, which overcomes the lattice energy of NaCl and causes it to dissolve in water.

In contrast, benzene is a nonpolar solvent that cannot solvate ions. The only intermolecular forces that can occur between NaCl and benzene are weak London dispersion forces. These forces are not strong enough to overcome the lattice energy of NaCl, which is the energy required to separate the ions in the solid state.

Therefore, the correct answer is option 2: ΔHSolvation > ΔHLattice energy in water and ΔHSolvation < ΔHLattice Energy in Benzene. The enthalpy of solvation is greater than the lattice energy in water, which allows NaCl to dissolve in water. However, the enthalpy of solvation is less than the lattice energy in benzene, which prevents NaCl from dissolving in benzene.


For Free Noteshttps://answerxpert.com/free-notes-answerxpert/
For Free Mock Testshttps://answerxpert.com/mock-tests-answerxpert/
Youtube channels for video solutionshttps://www.youtube.com/@AveshChemistry_
https://www.youtube.com/@AnswerXpert

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *